Online Course: DIY PR get media coverage for your business in 30 days.

Do It Yourself (DIY) public relations: how to secure media coverage for your business in 30 days whilst increasing your credibility and sales.

As a PR professional with well over a decade of experience, I know that getting your business or product featured in a major newspaper, magazine, publication or website is a great achievement and can boost awareness, credibility and sales.

The business growth potential that media coverage can generate is immense, getting mentioned on established media sites and publications allows you to build on the trust of these publications and gives your business or product exposure to the very audience you need, thus increasing your visibility and credibility.

I’ve designed this course so you can follow along at your own pace, sharing insider tactics and tips that we use as PR professionals to secure coverage for our clients. By using the strategies in this course, it won’t be long before you are reading about your business and gaining the coverage you desire for your business.

As an accredited expert in PR with a wealth of experience I’m sharing with you what we do as PR people to help our clients but at a fraction of the cost! So if you’re willing to do the work you will see results and get to reap the benefits.

This course will teach you:

How to understand PR and use it to gain press coverage
How to write a PR plan and the importance of creating key messages that align with your business goals
How to write a press release and find your USP
How to approach the media
How to pitch to the media
*Bonus module – how to leverage social media with PR to accelerate business growth.
**Bonus PDF downloadable materials to help you along your way:
PDF Template PR Plan
PDF Template Press Release
PDF Template journalist pitch email
PDF media database providers

Top four reason to buy this course:
• Save money and take charge of your business reputation
• To build your business and grow its reputation in the media
• To gain new customer/client awareness and sales
• To gain an insightful understanding of PR for your business

This course is worth $150 but I’m offering an introductory discounted price $40 for a limited time.

10 Tips for networking success

Networking can feel daunting for many. The idea of walking up to strangers at an event to spark up a conversation may fill the average person with panic, anxiety and could give them clammy hands.

Here are some tips to help you along your way:

Breathe
Take a deep breath and relax. Remember if you’re at a networking event everyone present is there for the same reason as you: to network and make connections. Try doing some deep breathing exercises to help you calm down: breathe in on the count of four, hold for the count of four and slowly release your breath for the count of four.

Attend events
There are events for every industry, be it tradeshows, meet-up events, conferences, breakfast seminars or lunch events. They all provide great networking opportunities. Make sure you are researching and attending relevant events to make new contacts.

Interact online
Don’t forget there are plenty of opportunities to network online via social platforms like LinkedIn and Facebook where you can find various groups with which to engage. There is also Instagram and Twitter, where you can participate in chats such as ‘#Bizhour’ which provide an opportunity to network with others from around the world.

Be visible
There’s no point going to a networking event and then hiding in the corner. Let your presence be known –go and introduce yourself and don’t forget to take your business cards. Remember to note down your new contacts.
I wrote this article for MBA World and you can read more here:

https://community.mbaworld.com/blog/b/weblog/posts/10-tips-for-networking-success#p8UBKa8d5tM2CEv3.99

9 to 5 work rebels on Youtube channel

So I’ve decided to finally join and upload videos on to youtube. I always advise clients to provide content in a variety of ways, as we all like to consume content differently. Some prefer to read, others like to see, or hear. So I’m taking my own advice so I can share my thoughts and tips for freeing yourself from the 9-5 as well as touching on other topics.

Subscribe and share – the title of my new channel is  9to5workrebels – if you have any questions or subjects you’d like me to cover let me know.

 

Why consultancy might be perfect for you

Working for yourself and being your own boss can be extremely empowering and fulfilling.  However, for some, it can be the total opposite – a completely daunting experience.

Not everyone wants to be a boss or run their own company and that is perfectly fine. The thought of having to manage people, be responsible for a company, operations, service delivery, human resources, finances etc. is no easy task and not for the faint-hearted.

On the flip side, working in a 9-5 (more like 9-6 these days) can also be a living night day-mare for many, it can be rigid, time-consuming and if you’re not happy doing it, a disappointing and miserable day-to-day encounter.

images-38

Middle-ground

That’s why, consulting, in my opinion, offers the perfect middle ground.  You are essentially working for yourself and registered as self-employed. You can choose to set up as a sole trader or a Limited Company you’ll still have the responsibility of managing some business tasks but on a much smaller scale. You can always elect to outsource business processes such as accounting and hire a virtual assistant.

Working as a consultant in the field you specialise in, means you can choose when and where you work. You can opt to work independently, in collaboration with others or decide to scale up and delegate to your own team of consultants. The decision is entirely up to you. It really comes down to how much responsibility you want to take on.

You can read the res of my article published via Precious online magazine.

 

Featured

Mental wellbeing in PR

Working in PR and communications is stressful, according to the recent CIPR state of the profession report, around one in six PR professionals (16%) report living with a mental health condition – an increase of 10% from the year before. Any percentage increase is a concern, and highlights that more needs to be done in our industry to address this. It’s fine to have policies in place but we need managers to recognise that their staff are their most important assets and happy healthy staff make for a productive work force. KPIs are important but so is mental wellness.

images-57

Like many I have suffered with depression myself, I recall working for a very well-known organisation, responsible for one of the largest and busiest directorate’s, my daughter was in nursery but was due to start primary school so I knew that I would have to look into flexible working to accommodate this.

I was juggling motherhood, the pressures of working in a high-profile press office and some personal family issues in addition to preparing for the transition from nursery to school and waiting for acceptance into both breakfast and afterschool clubs.

This is a piece I wrote for Mental Health Awareness Week, published in CIPR’s Influence Online magazine you can read the rest here

Featured

Colourful radio interview

I was interviewed by award winning business woman, author and radio host, Sonia Poleon, on the show I used to produce. We go into detail on what my new book ‘How to become a consultant’ covers and much more.

 

Listen here: http://www.colourfulradio.com/content/guest/31188

 

IMG_9055

Fearful of leaving the workplace?

Check out this interview I did with Sue Dougan, presenter of Track Record on Share Radio where I discuss attending BRIT school of Performing Arts as one of the first intakes in the mid 90s as well as my career.

Now a consultant, writer, presenter and volunteer with the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, I raise the idea that we can all work on a freelance or consultative capacity – so long as we’re prepared!

I also discuss how easy it can be to become fearful in the workplace, questioning our own skills and experience – and how we can overcome that. Click on the link below to listen.

https://www.shareradio.co.uk/podcasts/track-record-ebony-gayle-13-apr-18/PodcastPlayer

share radio screen shot

Is all publicity good publicity?

I’ve had this conversation on many occasions, is all publicity good publicity? I watched a show recently and a group of women were talking about the fact that one of them had been in the media and she wasn’t concerned about the fact that the publicity wasn’t favourable or positive it was entirely negative but to her all that mattered was that her name is out there.  That is something I hear often, people think as long as they’re being spoken about is all that matters.

Well as a professional in the business that has had to manage crisis communications on behalf of clients I don’t agree with this statement at all. Think about it, I’ve said it before if you’re a restaurant owner and you get a huge amount of negative media attention for food poisoning and rodent infestation how do you think that would impact your sales? I think it’s fair to say that your restaurant might look like a ghost town depending on the severity of the coverage.

That’s a hypothetical example so let us take a brief look at some real crisis that has taken place. Look at the BP Oil spill in the Gulf in 2010. BP understandably received a significant amount of negative press with images of the oil gushing out, animals covered in oil and news that 11 workers died in the explosion. I’m pretty certain that bosses at BP didn’t think oh well all publicity is good when they had people boycotting their fuel stations and a media frenzy covering the incident.

Or we could look at the UK supermarket horsemeat scandal in 2013 which resulted in a whole host of jokes, info-graphics and memes be circulated across the internet. Showing just how influential social media channels can be when it comes to the public’s perception. The scandal affected bottom line sales as well as loosing trust from consumers.

Another example is the video featuring two Dominos employees doing disgusting things to pizzas that amassed almost one million hits on YouTube! As you would expect it was extremely damaging for the brand.

These are loads of examples to illustrate how bad publicity has hurt brands. I believe there is such a thing as bad publicity and while most do recover from the crisis if handled openly and transparently the bad publicity they’ve received has done some serious reputational damage for at least the short term….. and maybe longer.

Now you’ve heard from me, but what do you think? Do you believe that all publicity is good publicity?  Feel free to leave a comment!

Five must have FREE PR tools for entrepreneurs

I am a big fan of using tools in business to improve organisation and efficiency and there are plenty out here claiming to do it all. As a PR professional I am always on the lookout for the latest technology that can add business value and ultimately enhance and make working life easier.

However a lot of these helpful tools do come at a large price for example tools like newswire services, media contacts and monitoring services like Precise, Gorkana and Cision can be very costly. They are useful tools but for this blog I have put on my frugal hat to highlight some free must have tools for PR… in no particular order.

Hootsuite or Tweetdeck  – great for managing social media allowing you to sync up your facebook and twitter accounts and schedule posts etc.

Google – this one goes without saying people Google everything these days and it comes in handy for PR research and much more.

Flipboard – keeping abreast of emerging news is very important and I really like this ‘Flipboard app’. The magazine style layout allows you to select topics of interest. If you’re not keen on the layout there are other options like Feedly.

Google alerts – I’ve always used this service and set up specific alerts for each client project to stay on top of client news. Google alerts  is a free service and is easy to use, it allows you to determine whether you want updates as and when they come or all complied into one email alert at the end of the day to avoid your inbox overloading.

Google docs  – is good web-based collaborative office software that is easy to use for your daily tasks and can save shelling out on a Microsoft office suite. Google allows for easy sharing of documents. Dropbox is also great for sharing documents and data with clients/colleagues.

Now reviewing this list you would think that I’m sponsored by Google, but I’m not, it just so happens that they have great tools that are free to use.

Feel free to comment on any free tools that you find useful.

Five ridiculous myths about PR

So I was having a chat recently with some friends about working in PR and it was interesting to hear what they thought PR was. What was funny was how many myths associated with the profession popped up during the convo, and I had fun trying to dispel them.  Here are my top five ridiculous myths about PR.

 

  1. PR is all about the Ab fab lifestyle – yep that old chestnut, the BBC comedy ‘Absolutely fabulous’ showed Jennifer Saunders working in the world of fashion PR. While it was hilarious to watch it is far from the truth. In reality we don’t all spend our time drinking, getting high and buttering up journalists. I recall my early days working in fashion and beauty PR to be, long hours and lots of hard work liaising with clients, pitching to journalists, distributing samples etc.

 

  1. All publicity is good publicity – I have heard this so many times and each time I have heard this and I wanted to shout erm NO! All media coverage is not good coverage, having worked on crisis situations in the past I know this to be entirely false. Think about it, if you’re a restaurant owner and you received negative media coverage about rodent infestation or if you’re CEO of an airline and you receive negative coverage about your planes being faulty and not up to scratch, do you think that would be good for business? Nope not at all.

 

  1. PR means press releases – People often get confused about what PR practitioners do, and think it’s just about churning out press releases for every and anything. PR is not just about pushing out press releases and media relations although it is an important element PR. PR is vital for informing, engaging and building relationships with your target audience, be it customers, suppliers, other businesses with an interest in yours. PR is also very important to your brand messaging which you want to be positive, and is the service you would turn to for help with a media crisis or negative media mentions.

 

  1. Anyone can do it – this is unfortunately a common misconception. Business owners often think that they can manage PR themselves to save money as all it takes is a press release and then the media gates flood open right?… Sorry to burst your bubble but it’s not that simple. PR is about reputation management, it is about communicating, clearly, concisely, effectively and strategising to build relationships with key stakeholders including the media.

 

  1. PR will make me or my company famous by tomorrow

To build brand awareness takes time, as consumers we don’t walk into a store or read an article and jump on the bandwagon immediately.  PR is an effective strategy to use for your business but you must remember that it can take time. PR is not based on luck it’s based on good PR planning. So remember when you start your PR campaign you may not necessarily see media coverage anywhere from a few weeks to three months into the campaign due to lead times for publications etc. But as long as the campaign continues you will see PR increase significantly over time.

Feel free to leave a comment and add any ridic myths that you know of!