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So the festive period is fast approaching, it will soon be the start of a New Year!  To help you to smash your goals for the coming year I’m offering over 70% off the online DIY PR course: How to get media coverage for your business, a festive gift for 50 hard working business owners at the bargain price of £32.99 for lifetime access! 

The course priced £129.99 will cost you a mere £32.99 for a limited time only so move fast – Click below to claim it now! Offer ends as soon as limited 50 passes are used up! 

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5 Tips for getting your business media coverage

So, you want to read about your business in the news, great, I don’t blame you. Media coverage can be a great boost for your business, and can help to build credibility, awareness and conversion rates. Therefore it’s understandable that business owners see the benefit of media coverage.

But how do you go about getting some media coverage for your business, there’s hundreds of thousands of businesses all looking to get their names out to the public and there are thousands of media outlets looking for news, but just the thought of that can feel overwhelming. You might have PR on your to do list and it has turned into a task that you are constantly putting off. Or maybe you’ve tried to secure some coverage for yourself and not had much luck. Well here are five tips for you.

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  1. Is it newsworthy?

I’m a straight shooter, so I’ll get straight to the point, before you spend lots of time on trying to do a big PR push, firstly let’s look at what it is you want to tell the media about. Asking yourself if your story is news worthy is the first point of call. What may interest you might not interest a journalist and their readers.

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  1. Research

Spend some time going through your local newspaper or the relevant publications in your industry to see what kind of stories they cover and see if you can create something similar for your business. Research media outlets that cover your industry and your competitors.

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  1. List building

Following on from your research start to build a mini media list for yourself of those outlets that cover your area. You can always introduce yourself to local media so they know they can come to you on particular stories.

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  1. Think of the readers

Most of the time when clients come to me they are relying on my expertise to highlight relevant media. However, I have come across a few that have their media wish list of titles that they want to be featured in. This can be fine if it fits, however on a couple of occasions the outlets have been a total mismatch for the business. Make sure you are pitching to the right audience and at the right level.

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  1. Don’t be salesy

We don’t like the cheesy sales reps so don’t turn into one yourself, if you have a story idea pitch it to the journalist, be honest and helpful – don’t overdo it and don’t pester. If you send them an email, you can chase up, but don’t turn into a stalker.

 

Have any tips you can think of? Leave your comments below and don’t forget to check out this video on how to get media coverage.

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Big PR ambitions on a small budget? Check this out

As business owners and entrepreneurs, you will be aware that getting your business or product featured in a major newspaper, magazine, publication or website is a great achievement and can boost awareness, credibility and sales.

Having worked in PR for well over a decade I’ve come across many new business owners who are desperately seeking PR help but don’t have the financial means to do so.

This is exactly why I created this course, to help those who are unable to foot the bill of agencies and consultants. This course will kick start your PR activity and give you an understanding of how to use PR to increase your profile.

The course will teach you:

How to understand PR and use it to gain press coverage
How to write a PR plan and the importance of creating key messages that align with your business goals
How to write a press release and find your USP
How to approach the media
How to pitch to the media
*Bonus module – how to leverage social media with PR to accelerate business growth.
**Bonus PDF downloadable materials to help you meet your PR objectives:
PDF Template PR Plan
PDF Template Press Release
PDF Template journalist pitch email
PDF media database providers

PDF 8 Steps to approaching the media

PDF Key media holiday dates & hash tags to help your story

Enjoy and let me know how you get on!

P.S. I’m offering enhanced package for those that need an extra helping hand – where you get my expert review of your DIY PR plan and make recommendations – check out my services page

Is all publicity good publicity?

I’ve had this conversation on many occasions, is all publicity good publicity? I watched a show recently and a group of women were talking about the fact that one of them had been in the media and she wasn’t concerned about the fact that the publicity wasn’t favourable or positive it was entirely negative but to her all that mattered was that her name is out there.  That is something I hear often, people think as long as they’re being spoken about is all that matters.

Well as a professional in the business that has had to manage crisis communications on behalf of clients I don’t agree with this statement at all. Think about it, I’ve said it before if you’re a restaurant owner and you get a huge amount of negative media attention for food poisoning and rodent infestation how do you think that would impact your sales? I think it’s fair to say that your restaurant might look like a ghost town depending on the severity of the coverage.

That’s a hypothetical example so let us take a brief look at some real crisis that has taken place. Look at the BP Oil spill in the Gulf in 2010. BP understandably received a significant amount of negative press with images of the oil gushing out, animals covered in oil and news that 11 workers died in the explosion. I’m pretty certain that bosses at BP didn’t think oh well all publicity is good when they had people boycotting their fuel stations and a media frenzy covering the incident.

Or we could look at the UK supermarket horsemeat scandal in 2013 which resulted in a whole host of jokes, info-graphics and memes be circulated across the internet. Showing just how influential social media channels can be when it comes to the public’s perception. The scandal affected bottom line sales as well as loosing trust from consumers.

Another example is the video featuring two Dominos employees doing disgusting things to pizzas that amassed almost one million hits on YouTube! As you would expect it was extremely damaging for the brand.

These are loads of examples to illustrate how bad publicity has hurt brands. I believe there is such a thing as bad publicity and while most do recover from the crisis if handled openly and transparently the bad publicity they’ve received has done some serious reputational damage for at least the short term….. and maybe longer.

Now you’ve heard from me, but what do you think? Do you believe that all publicity is good publicity?  Feel free to leave a comment!